A wealth of talent

June 2, 2013 at 9:31 am 1 comment

Yesterday I visited the biennial affiliates exhibition at the Embroiderers’ Guild of Queensland in Fortitude Valley – The Ties That Bind includes some amazing needlework by members of some of the guild’s regional branches and there’s also a simultaneous Australian Lace Guild (Queensland) exhibition upstairs. If you want to check it out, head along to their beautiful old building at 149 Brunswick Street between now and Sunday 9 June.

I walked around the show with a lovely older lady who happens to share my name (the only disappointment was that most of the audience had a good three decades on me!) and there were so many great examples of work. The entries from the Toowoomba branch were a cut above the rest, but there were some beauties throughout the whole show. Here are a few of my favourites…

Jacobean Redwork embroidered by Rae Siebenhausen (Toowoomba) – a Marlene Lambert design embroidered with stranded cotton threads.

Jacobean redwork by Rae Siebenhausen

Camellia Growing in My Garden embroidered by Margaret Wormwell (Toowoomba) – gorgeous wired stumpwork.

Camellia by Margaret Wormwell

Blue Wrens Over Bay of Fires, Tasmania embroidered by Cheryl Kealy (Toowoomba) – designed from a photo and featuring layered background fabrics, raised and silk embroidery.

Blue Wrens Over Bay of Fires by Cheryl Kealy

Kingfisher embroidered by Barbara Harris (Southport) – embroidered using silk surface technique, adapted from a Trish Burr design.

Kingfisher by Barbara Harris

Blackwork Peacock embroidered by Diane Lazarus (Sunshine Coast) – a Tanja Berlin design worked in gold thread and rayon floss.

Blackwork peacock by Diane Lazarus

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1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Forestwoodfolkart  |  June 12, 2013 at 9:56 am

    Missed this exhibition, but I did go to one a few years back. It is such a shame that there is not more younger people interested in keeping these wonderful techniques alive!

    Reply

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